Nerdly News

new&nerdlyHomo naledi may be quite a bit younger than previously thought. A new study suggests they may have been around less than a million years ago, coexisting with other, larger brained, hominin species. The study was unable to conclude whether the species was closer to other early members of the genus Homo or to the australopiths.

The order of events at a fascinating 12,000 Natufian burial have been reconstructed.

The woman was laid on a bed of specially selected materials, including gazelle horn cores, fragments of chalk, fresh clay, limestone blocks and sediment. Tortoise shells were placed under and around her body, 86 in total. Sea shells, an eagle’s wing, a leopard’s pelvis, a forearm of a wild boar and even a human foot were placed on the body of the mysterious 1.5 meter-tall woman. Atop her body, a large stone was laid to seal the burial space.

What was the significance of the tortoise, I wonder? Not to mention the other animal parts. The specificity just begs all sorts of questions to which we’ll probably never know the answers.

The colonization of Madagascar is a hotly debated topic among anthropologists. A new study

…has shown that the Malagasy genetic diversity is 68 percent African and 32 percent Asian. Based on their evidence, the Banjar were the most probable Asian population that traveled to Madagascar. The genetic dating supports the hypothesis that this Austronesian migration occurred around 1,000 years ago, while the last significant Bantu migration to Madagascar began 300 years later, perhaps following climate change in Africa.

The most probable Bornean origin population were Banjar, who, at the time, probably spoke a language ancestral to Malagasy,or, at least, closely related to Proto-Malagasy.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s