June Reads, 2017

SilverSilence_SinghSilver Silence by Nalini Singh.  I loved this book! Hope we get to see a whole lot more of StoneWater. And add my vote for an Arwen/Pasha novella. Pretty please!  Lots of other story possibilities here.  Stasya and someone from BlackEdge, for instance.  Tanique and Leila.  I don’t think it’s time for Bo, because I really think he’s going to be paired with Miane.  And, of course, poor Lily.

About the Architect.  Shoshona would be way too easy.  But I have no doubt she’s involved, and no doubt thinks she’s the Architect!

Lady Susan by Jane Austen.  I very much enjoyed this early Austen work and don’t see why anyone thinks it needed a rewrite.  It didn’t take very long at all for me to have a serious hate on for Lady Susan Vernon.

DangerousDuke-London_HunterThe Most Dangerous Duke in London by Madeline Hunter.  Typical historical romance with an angry hero bent on revenge on the heroine’s family.  Enjoyable while I was reading, but not much stuck with me afterwards.  The heroine, Lady Clara, was a little unusual in that she was aware of this possible/probable motive for seduction.

Mansfield Park by Jane Austen.  After reading and loving Lady Susan, I decided to read another Jane Austen work I hadn’t yet read.  I didn’t like it nearly as much.  Mostly, I think, because I didn’t warm to any of the characters.  No one stood out or inspired much emotion in me at all.  Very un-Austen.  The exception on the emotion front was Mr. Crawford.  I wanted to smack him.

Neanderthal_CameronThe Last Neanderthal by Claire Cameron.  This was an enjoyable, imaginative read, but I think I would have enjoyed this book more without the trips into the modern world.  I realize that the comparison between Girl and Rose, between a Neanderthal and a modern human female, was one of the main themes of the books, but I would have preferred knowing how Girl interacted with the female who was and was not part of the families she meets at the end of the novel.

The Chosen by J. R. Ward.  The only thing of interest here, for me, was Lassiter’s change in station.  Layla and X’cor hold no interest for me, and, frankly, I’m getting a little tired of Qhuinn being an ass and Blay tragically suffering for it.  I think this marks the end of the BDB for me.  I’m even less interested in Assail than I was in Layla and X’cor.

Winnie-the-Pooh makes friends with a penguin to mark anniversary | Books | The Guardian

milne_90_bestbearNinety years after AA Milne’s first book about Christopher Robin’s bear, the much loved children’s character is returning with a new companion

Source: Winnie-the-Pooh makes friends with a penguin to mark anniversary | Books | The Guardian

Any other grown-ups looking forward to reading this? I LOVED Winnie-the-Pooh, and Tigger, too. And I still do. As I discovered a few years ago when my sister and her son, Brady, were visiting. Reading him The House at Pooh Corner brought back memories.  I wonder if Disney has bought the rights, yet?

The Language of Homer

The Iliad and The Odyssey are two of the most enduring works of fiction (or “fiction”, if you prefer) ever composed.  Although it is doubtful that they were composed in their entirety by a single individual, they are traditionally attributed to a blind bard called Homer.  Recently, The World According to Sound aired a podcast about the language in which these works were composed.  A form of ancient Greek that sounded nothing like its modern descendant.  According to this, this dialect was a tonal language.  An example of a modern tonal language is Chinese.

The story was picked up and, partially, rebroadcast, on NPR’s All Things ConsideredThe Sound Of Ancient Greek.

 

 

LibraryReads September List

library_reads_logo_websiteForman_LeaveMeLibraryReads has released their September list, and the favorite, Leave Me by Gayle Forman, looks pretty good. It’s main character, Maribeth Klein, is a magazine editor, wife, and mother of preschool-aged twins. Her life is so busy, so demanding, that when she has a heart attack and doesn’t realize it. Told to rest, she tries but this seems to be an imposition on the lives on others, she packs up and leaves. Of course, with distance, her life looks very different.

Colgan_BookshopPatchett_CommonwealthThe Bookshop on the Corner by Jenny Colgan and Ann Patchett’s Commonwealth also perked my interest. In the first a city librarian loses her job, moves to Middle-of-Nowhere, Scotland, and buys a van which she turns into a bookmobile, and the second features two families closely intertwined by adultery, betrayal, and abandonment.  A married father of four and a married mother of two leave their families to be with each other.  Commonweath explores the aftermath.

Bolton_Daisy I find I’m wavering back and forth about Sharon Bolton’s Daisy in Chains about a man convicted for being a serial killer, and, continuing to protest his innocence, hires a hotshot lawyer famous for getting convictions overturned. When I check, it actually sounds more intriguing on Goodreads than at LibraryReads.

Also on the list is the second book in Genevieve Cogman’s Invisible Library series, The Masked City. I haven’t gotten around to reading the first one, yet, but they sound interesting.

What about you? Anything on this list going on your TBR pile?

July Reads 2016

The Tiger and Wolf by Adrian Tchaikovsky turned out to be an interesting read, if a bit long. The revelation about Maniye’s mother, the Tiger Queen, I saw coming a mile away, the one about her father, however, shocked the hell out of me. Still didn’t like him. At first, I rooted fervently for the Tigers to make a come back and kick some serious Wolf ass, but, after I met the Tigers, I hoped someone would show up and defeat them both. I think I’d prefer to be a Serpent, a Bear, or a Horse. I don’t know if I’ll follow Maniye and her companions to the Sun River Nation in The Bear and the Serpent or not.

Next was Once a Soldier, the first book in Mary Jo Putney’s Rogue’s Redeemed series. This is a spin-off of her Lost Lords. I didn’t enjoy it as much as I thought I would. The secondary romance in this book was more interesting the primary one. The tiny kingdom of San Gabriel, between Portugal and Spain, fictitious though it is, does sound like a place I’d like to visit.

After that, I read the first three books in Stephanie Rowe’s Order of the Blade series. In this series, the Order is a group of elite, immortal warriors of the Caledon people (I’m still not entirely clear on what a Caledon is) formed to combat rogue Caledons. See, Caledons are fated to go rogue when they meet their fated mates, so the Order kills either them or, if it’s a member of the Order, their mate. Not sure if I’ll continue with this series.

Lisa Kleypas’s Marrying Winterbourne, book two of the Ravenels, was fun. I’ll go back and read the first one Cold-Hearted Rake, sometime before the third book, Devil in Spring comes out in February.

I tried to read Against the Wind by Kat Martin, but only got a couple of chapters in before I tossed it. Boring. Same with Cathy Maxwell’s The Fairest of Them All. That one was just plain stupid.

Next up, Rock Wedding. This is not my favorite of Nalini Singh’s series, but they don’t completely such. However, this one left something to be desired. It just didn’t have the charisma, that’s the best word I can think of to describe it, of Singh’s other novels.

Things improved with Eloisa James’s My American Duchess. I’m hoping for a sequel about Cedric. I also had fun with the first two books of Isabella Bradford’s Breconridge Brothers trilogy, A Wicked Pursuit and A Sinful Deception.

When I find the time, I’ll start Amulya Malladi’s new book, A House for Happy Mothers which will, probably, be followed by Amy E. Reichert’s Luck, Love & Lemon Pie.

How about y’all. Anything good?

LibraryReads July 2016

library_reads_logo_websiteRosen_DressThe LibraryReads July list is out.  I’ve had my eye on Nine Women, One Dress for a while.  It sounds like the perfect girl-read for a summer’s day kicked back in the front porch swing sipping iced tea.  Or on the beach with a margarita.  Whatever floats your boat.

The new Liane Moriarty, Truly Madly Guilty, may also be worth a look.  Their review makes it sound way more interesting than the official blurb does, I’ve gotta say.  This one’s a we’ll see.Oliva_Last-One

Another book to capture my interest was The Last One by Alexandra Oliva.  This one surprised me.  To be honest, I’ve never liked Survivor or any of its spawn.  It’s always struck me as ridiculous.  And, as a plot device in fiction, it really hasn’t done anything for me.  Kresley Cole’s No Rest for the Wicked comes to mind.  That book annoyed the hell out of me.  Enough, that my reading of the Immortals After Dark series stalled for a long time.  And it had vampires, Valkyries, and other paranormals to liven it up.  But The Last One actually sounds really good.  Of course, I have a weakness for post-apocalyptic fiction.  Sigh.

What about y’all?  Anything catch your eye?

Column of Fire, a third Kingsbridge novel, coming fall 2017

It’s time for fans of Ken Follett and his awesome Pillars of the Earth to do a happy dance.  We’ll be back in Kingsbridge next fall.  The new book is “provisionally titled ‘A Column of Fire’.”  Hints dropped so far include:  Elizabethan Era, Francis Walsingham’s spy network, and a portion of the book being set in Seville, Spain.

I adored Pillars of the Earth and World Without End.  You can bet this one will be on my most anticipated reads list come January.

May Reads 2016

TangleofNeed_NaliniSinghThis month has, mostly, been occupied by my Psy-Changeling reread and am more than ready for Allegiance of Honor. Even after this third time reading Tangle of Need, I still think Adria got gypped. That one continues to irritate me.

Between visits with the leopards, the wolves, and the Psy (oh my!), I read a few other things.  I really enjoyed the latest in Lorraine Heath’s Hellions of Havisham series, The Earl Takes All.  Although, I do think Julia was way less pissed than she should have been.  She forgave Edward too easily.  Earl-Takes_HeathOnly Beloved, the last book in Mary Balogh’s Survivors Club, was another good one, and I also enjoyed her novella, Another Dream, in Once Upon a Dream.  Wulfric Bedwyn continues to be one of my favorite fictional gentlemen.  Less enjoyable was Eva Leigh’s The Temptations of a Wallflower, the third installment in her Wicked Quills of London series. I almost choked on some of the purple prose spouted by The Lady of Dubious Quality.Beloved_Balogh

Next was Eligible by Curtis Sittenfeld. It didn’t take two chapters before things started going down hill. Sittenfeld’s Lizzie Bennett is, obviously an idiot, a condition to which I vehemently object in that character. I managed to stick it out until chapter 38 when Jasper’s last name was revealed. It kind of dashed my last hopes for Liz’s intelligence. However, on the bright side, Sittenfeld’s Mr. Bennett made me laugh every bit as much as his Austenian counterpart, but, alas, this was not enough to induce me to continue.

I picked up the much anticipated by me Britt-Marie Was Here by Fredrik Backman and the very interesting sounding Daughter of Albion by Ilka Tampke, but I haven’t found the time to dive into them, yet.  That’s for June.

What have y’all been reading and loving lately?

LibraryReads June 2016

library_reads_logo_websiteGyasi_HomecomingThis month’s favorite is Vinegar Girl by Anne Tyler, a modern day retelling of Shakespeare’s The Taming of the Shrew.  It was already on my reading list, but the book on this list that most intrigues me is Homegoing by Yaa Gyasi.  Homegoing is a tale of two sisters of wildly disparate fates, one marries well, the other is sold into slavery.

Also of interest is The Invisible Library by Genevieve Cogman, where spy librarians visit alternate realities and search out and “acquire” special volumes for their collections. Cogman_Invisible

I may also read Lily and the Octopus by Steven Rowley.  Occasionally, I enjoy a good tear jerker.

Here’s the full list.  What’s on it you can’t wait to read?

I’m really surprised that neither Bark Skins by Anne Proulx nor The Mandibles: A Family, 2029-2047 by Lionel Shriver is on this list.  Of course, my most anticipated read of the month is Allegiance of Honor.  🙂

LibraryReads May 2016

library_reads_logo_websiteBritt-Marie_BlackmanWell, I definitely agree with the librarians’ choice of favorite, Britt-Marie Was Here by Fredrik Backman, which made my most anticipated reads list.  This is a sequel to the much loved My Grandmother Asked Me to Tell You She’s Sorry.  I gave it 5 stars.  If you’ll remember, I said I wanted to give the stuffy, slightly OCD Britt-Marie a boot in the backside.  🙂  Can’t wait to see what she gets up to now that she’s no longer chained to that a–hole.  Lamb_MilletVyleta_Smoke

Beyond that, Sweet Lamb of Heaven by Lydia Millet sounds interesting, and I’m especially intrigued by Dan Vyleta Smoke.

You can see the entire May list here.  See anything you like?