DNA of early Neanderthal gives timeline for new modern human-related dispersal from Africa | EurekAlert! Science News

Annette Günzel, © Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History

This is a schematic representation of the evolutionary scenario for mitochondrial and nuclear DNA in archaic and modern humans. Neanderthal mitochondrial DNA recovered in this study suggests an intermediate migration out of Africa before 220,000 years ago.


Ancient mitochondrial DNA from the femur of an archaic European hominin is helping resolve the complicated relationship between modern humans and Neanderthals. The genetic data, recovered by a team from the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, the University of Tuebingen, and others, provides a timeline for a proposed migration out of Africa that occurred after the ancestors of Neanderthals arrived in Europe by a lineage more closely related to modern humans.

Source: DNA of early Neanderthal gives timeline for new modern human-related dispersal from Africa | EurekAlert! Science News


The Brothers Bourden: Isle of Wight County, Virginia

Nicholas Bourden and Prudence Wrenn, “relict” of John Wrenn, were married in Isle of Wight County, Virginia, before 1738 (The Marriages of Isle of Wight County, Virginia, 1628-1800 by Blanche Adams Chapman, page 5).  On November 16th of that year, Nicholas was referred to as “brother-in-law” in the will of Prudence’s brother, Samuel Davis (Wills and Administrations of Isle of Wight County, Virginia, 1647-1800, Volume 2, by Blanche Adams Chapman, page 136).  Since their first child was born in April of 1737, they were most likely married in 1736.  There is a John Wrenn whose estate was ordered to be appraised March 22, 1735.  Whether this was Prudence’s husband or some other John Wrenn, I don’t know.  She married him sometime before August 15, 1734, when she’s referred to as Prudence Wrenn in the will of her brother, Thomas Davis (Wills and Administrations of Isle of Wight County, Virginia, 1647-1800, Volume 2, page 70), but after 1720 when she’s referred to as Prudence Davis in the will of her mother, Mary Davis (Wills and Administrations of Isle of Wight County, Virginia, 1647-1800, Volume 2, page 9).  There is reason to believe the marriage took place before 1727 (see below).  Also, the wording of her mother’s will may imply that Prudence had not yet attained the age of 21.

The births of Nicholas and Prudence’s five children were recorded in the Newport Parish Vestry Book, which can be viewed at FamilySearch.org (Virginia, Isle of Wight County Records, 1634-1951 – Church Records – Vestry Book, 1727-1772).  Bottom right of image 117 for the boys, left side of image 119 for Mary.  If you’d rather not strain your eyes reading old documents, this information can also be found in Tyler’s Quarterly Historical and Genealogical Magazine, Volume 9, Number 2, page 119. This can also be accessed through FamilySearch.

The children of Nicholas Bourden and Prudence Davis Wrenn were:

  • Samuel Bourden b. April 14, 1737
  • John Bourden b. June 10, 1739
  • Nicholas Bourden, Jr. b. March 25, 1741
  • Baker Bourden b. January 10, 1742/3
  • Mary Bourden b. March 30, 1745

The above list is slightly different from that found in Tyler’s Quarterly which has Baker being born in the month of June.  However, looking at the Vestry Book, I think it may actually be January.  Compare the June written for John


with what’s written for Baker.


Doesn’t the second letter look like an “a” rather than a “u”?  And the fourth more a “u” than an “e”?  Its being January instead of June would also explain the 1742/3 thing.  Mary’s birth year is written in Roman numerals, of all things:  MDCCXLV.  The “V” is written with quite a flourish.

Besides the five children she gave Nicholas, Prudence had two children with John Wrenn.  One of these was named John.  In the Vestry Book, at the very bottom of image 117, you can just make out “John Wren son of John Wren and Prudence his wife….”  The next line, which would be his birth date, is illegible due to extreme fading.


We know there was another child because of the Accounts of the Estate of John Wrenn (scroll down a bit), taken by Nicholas and Prudence in 1748 (James Baker was ordered to audit the Accounts of the Estate August 12, 1748), in which there is the entry “To bringing up two small Children.”  The implication being that the youngest was now of age. In those days, this meant they were at least 21 years of age, that is born in or before 1727.  I’ve seen several online trees that say the Thomas Wrenn who married Catherine Ingram was the other child, but, as yet, no one has offered any actual proof that I’ve seen.

If Nicholas and Prudence used conventional Colonial naming patterns, which is suggested by second son John, for her father, John Davis, and third son, Nicholas (for him), then eldest son, Samuel, would have been named after his paternal grandfather.  As for the fourth son, Baker, I’ve wondered if Baker was the maiden name of Nicholas’s mother.  Thus, Nicholas Bourden, Sr., may have been the son of Samuel Bourden and ? Baker.  Of course, I have no proof of that, so it’s complete speculation.

With Prudence, we’re on much firmer ground.  She was the daughter of John Davis and Mary Green.  An abstract of John’s will can be found in Chapman’s Wills and Administrations of Isle of Wight County, Virginia, 1647-1800, Volume 1, page 79, and Mary’s in Volume 2, page 9.  We’ll get into her family in more detail in future posts.

The first appearance of Nicholas Bourden in the records was in Elizabeth City County where on December 2, 1734, he witnessed the will of John Kerby (Wills and Administrations of Elizabeth City County, Virginia, 1688-1800 by Blanche Adams Chapman, page 48).  And on April 4, 1735, still in Elizabeth City County, he witnessed another will, that of Mary Picket (same source, page 69).  After his marriage to Prudence, Nicholas’s name is peppered throughout the second volume of Chapman’s Wills and Administrations of Isle of Wight County as he appraises, examines and settles many estates.  The first of these occurs at the bottom of page 91, where he and Lawrence Baker settle the estate of Jeremiah Ingraham, October 23, 1738.

On December 20, 1738, Nicholas Bourden wrote a letter to The Virginia Gazette about a tragic incident which occurred the Wednesday prior, December 13 (Some Descendants of John Moone ca 1600-1655 and Nicholas Bourden ca 1700-1759: Jamestown and Isle of wight County In the Colony of Virginia by Richard Bowden Jones, page 7, citing The Virginia Gazette, Issue Number 133).  Images of the Virginia Gazette can be accessed through the Colonial Williamsburg website.  Go to Research – Online Resources – Digital Library – Virginia Gazettes.  You’re looking for Parks, 1739, February 23.  This letter is on page 3, bottom right.

Isle of Wight County, Dec. 20, 1738

Mr. Parks,
The Publication of the following unhappy Accident, may be a Means to prevent the like in other Families, which I hope will be a Warning to all; and desire it may be inserted in your Gazette, for the Public Good. On Wednesday the Thirteenth of this Instant, I intended to kill some hogs, and accordingly put a Kettle of water, containing 20 Gallons, over the Fire, for that Purpose; and when the Water was boiling, none being in the Kitchen but my only Child and a Negro child, the Sway-Pole broke, and scalded them to such a Degree that twas a most horrid Spectacle, and must have moved the most obdurate. The Negro Child is dead, but my own Child, I hope is in a fair Way of Recover tho’ prodigiously scalded: My Wife very narrowly escaped the same Fate; for she had not gone three Steps from the Kitchen Door, before the Kettle fell down, when she sat on her Hams, putting some Potatoes in the Fire for the Children: The Children were both in the Corner when the Kettle fell down, or it must have been present Death.

I am, Sir, Your humble Servant,

Nicholas BOURDEN.

Samuel would have been just over a year and half and Prudence would have been carrying John, though she may not have known it yet.

Adventurers of Purse and Person, Virginia, 1607-1624/5: Families G-P by John Frederick Dorman, page 681, mentions that Samuel was ordered bound to John Dering, a tailor, August 1, 1751.  He’d have been 14.  Samuel, along with James Dering and Martha Dering, witnessed the will of Benjamin Barlow (bottom of page and onto next page) December 26, 1757.  The will was registered April 5, 1759.

Louise Jones abstracted entries from various Isle of Wight County records concerning “Orphans and Other Children of Isle of Wight County” which were published over several issues of The Virginia Genealogical Society Quarterly and of which I’ve only had glimpses thanks to my free Ancestry account.  I can’t afford a paid account right now, so all I get are frustrating snippets.  But what intriguing snippets they are!

  • August 1,…Samuel Bourden, orphan of Nicholas is…Taylor [James Dering, tailor?]. p. 342.   (Volume 25, Number 2)
  • 6 July…John Bourden, orphan of Nicholas, is to…    (Volume 26, Number 1)
  • Snippet of the index to Volume 26, Number 1 lists Baker on page 32 and John on page 31

If you put the snippet about Samuel together with the apprentice bond mentioned in Dorman, both dated August 1, then it’s possible that Nicholas Bourden had died earlier in 1751 or in late 1750.  On page 8 of his book cited above, Richard Bowden Jones says that John was bound out in July 1759 and Baker in November of that year.  I’ve yet to find mention of young Nicholas being apprenticed to anyone.  If anyone has further information on this, either through the aforementioned article or the Isle of Wight County Order Book, 1746-1752, please contact me via comments.  Thank you so much, in advance.

Young Nicholas witnessed the will of a John Davis February 1, 1762 (Wills and Administrations of Isle of Wight County, Virginia, 1647-1800, Volume 3, by Blanche Adams Chapman, page 12).  Whether uncle or cousin, I’m not sure.  John Bourden was one of the men to appraise the estate of John Jackson which was recorded January 6, 1763 (same source, page 20).  This is the last public record, that I’m aware of, in which John appears.  It’s possible he died shortly after this.  And, as far as I know, there’s no mention of Mary after her birth.  Of course, it’s harder to find women in the records and she may have married or she may have died in childhood.  Either way, she’s left no trace. There is no record, that I know of, that either John or Mary ever left Virginia, but the other three migrated to Duplin County, North Carolina.

Which is where we’ll follow them next.

Update 7/7/2017:  I finally managed access to the above mentioned articles in the Virginia Genealogical Society Quarterly.  The article, “Orphans and Other Children of Isle of Wight County”, yielded no further information than that given by Mr. Jones in his book and recounted above.  However, there was another article, “Isle of Wight County Order Book, 1746-1752” (Volumes 38 through 40), which gave me this gem, from Volume 40-1, p. 54 (emphasis mine):

Francis Wrenn, plantiff, vs. Nicholas Bourden, type: in chancery, verdict: dismissed due to the death of the defendant.

The date for that entry was January 4, 1749.  From this, we can conclude that Nicholas died late in 1748.  Other entries from the Order Books:

9 Apr 1747 – William Sutter provided evidence for Robert Bureswetter, Gent. vs. Nicholas Bourden.
9 Jul 1747 – Robert Burwell, Gent. plantiff, vs. Nicholas Bourden.
5 Apr 1750 – John Davis, Edward Brantley & wife Mary, Nicholas Bourden & wife Prudence, & Sarah Murry, plantiffs vs. John Davis admin of Elizabeth Davis…verdict dismissed, parties agreed.

“…Out on your corner in the pouring rain…”

I heard this at Walmart the other day and it’s been stuck in my head ever since. Maybe because it was pouring rain when I went in. 🙂

I don’t mind spending every day / Out on your corner in the pouring rain….

June Reads, 2017

SilverSilence_SinghSilver Silence by Nalini Singh.  I loved this book! Hope we get to see a whole lot more of StoneWater. And add my vote for an Arwen/Pasha novella. Pretty please!  Lots of other story possibilities here.  Stasya and someone from BlackEdge, for instance.  Tanique and Leila.  I don’t think it’s time for Bo, because I really think he’s going to be paired with Miane.  And, of course, poor Lily.

About the Architect.  Shoshona would be way too easy.  But I have no doubt she’s involved, and no doubt thinks she’s the Architect!

Lady Susan by Jane Austen.  I very much enjoyed this early Austen work and don’t see why anyone thinks it needed a rewrite.  It didn’t take very long at all for me to have a serious hate on for Lady Susan Vernon.

DangerousDuke-London_HunterThe Most Dangerous Duke in London by Madeline Hunter.  Typical historical romance with an angry hero bent on revenge on the heroine’s family.  Enjoyable while I was reading, but not much stuck with me afterwards.  The heroine, Lady Clara, was a little unusual in that she was aware of this possible/probable motive for seduction.

Mansfield Park by Jane Austen.  After reading and loving Lady Susan, I decided to read another Jane Austen work I hadn’t yet read.  I didn’t like it nearly as much.  Mostly, I think, because I didn’t warm to any of the characters.  No one stood out or inspired much emotion in me at all.  Very un-Austen.  The exception on the emotion front was Mr. Crawford.  I wanted to smack him.

Neanderthal_CameronThe Last Neanderthal by Claire Cameron.  This was an enjoyable, imaginative read, but I think I would have enjoyed this book more without the trips into the modern world.  I realize that the comparison between Girl and Rose, between a Neanderthal and a modern human female, was one of the main themes of the books, but I would have preferred knowing how Girl interacted with the female who was and was not part of the families she meets at the end of the novel.

The Chosen by J. R. Ward.  The only thing of interest here, for me, was Lassiter’s change in station.  Layla and X’cor hold no interest for me, and, frankly, I’m getting a little tired of Qhuinn being an ass and Blay tragically suffering for it.  I think this marks the end of the BDB for me.  I’m even less interested in Assail than I was in Layla and X’cor.

Feline Urethral Obstruction: Be Aware

All cat owners need to read this article:  Help… my cat can’t pee! Feline Urethral Obstruction: Be Aware.

My Kisses. The sweetest, cutest, most adorable boy in the world. He loved to play with “weeds.”

My sweet, beautiful, gorgeous boy died of this today. I didn’t even know it was possible for this to happen! The first signs are very similar to constipation and that’s what I thought it was when he spent an abnormal amount of time in the litter box. I have, or had, now, two cats. When I scoop out a pee, how am I to know which one did it? And by the time I noticed, it was too late.

Everyone everywhere is always telling you to spay and neuter your pets. They don’t tell you about this and they should. It should be included in the information they give you about the surgery.  Before you comment, no, I am NOT advocating against spaying/neutering, but for the pet owner’s being completely informed.

Please, if you know anyone who has a cat, especially a neutered male, please tell them about this.

A Couple of Gatlin Queries

Over the last couple of days, I’ve made a couple of posts on the Gatlin Message Board at Ancestry and figured I might as well post them here as well.

First:  A Question About McDuffie’s Book

On page 20 of her book, McDuffie refers to a land grant received by a William Gatlin in Craven County in 1738. Has anyone actually found this grant? I’ve looked at the Craven County Register of Deeds website, done an NC Mars Archive Basic Search, and a query at the site North Carolina Land Grant Images and Data. Nothing. The earliest grant to a William Gatlin I’ve been able to find in Craven County is 1763.

And second: The Husband of Mary Johnson

In his will, dated April 26, 1796, Richard Johnson makes bequests to his three sisters Elizabeth Gatlin, Easter Gatlin, and Mary Gatlin. Elizabeth was the wife of Edward (d. 1781), son of John (d. 1766) and Easter/Esther the wife of John (prob. d. 1801), son of Edward (d. 1763). Who was the husband of Mary Johnson? Any ideas? In the will, the bequests to Elizabeth and Easter are “to her & her heirs and assigns for Ever”, but Mary’s is ” to her & her assigns for Ever.” Other bequests were made to nephew, Richard Johnson Daughter (perhaps Daughtry or Daugherty), niece, Sarah Gatlin, daughter of Elizabeth, and to “cousin” Persis Lambert.

But there certainly are not so many men of large fortune in the world as there are pretty women to deserve them.Jane Austen, Mansfield Park

Will of Solomon Tingle

In the name of God Amen: 30th d of September annodomi 1784

I Solomon Tingle be good and perfect memory thanks be Almighty God and calling to Remembrance the Uncontant Estate of this Transitory Life and that all flesh must yeld unto death when it Shall pleas God to call I do make and declare this my Last will and Testament in manor and form following first being penintent and sory for all my Sins most humbly desreng for giveness for the I comend my Soul unto almighty god my Saviour and redeemer in whom and by whouse merets I trust and blive assuredly to be Saved and to have full remssion and for giveness of all my Sins and to inheret the Kingdom of heaven and my bodey I commit to the Earth and to be desentlyt bured at the discretion of my Executors hereafter named Goods Chatles debates as it hath pleased God to bestow upon me I do order and give and dispose the Same in manner and form following that is to imprmis} I give and beqeath to my son Solomon Tingle my plantation with 125 acers of land 1 hefer 1 bead and furntear after his mothers deth–

I Give and beqeath to my son John Tingle 125 acers of wodden Land begegining at the 2 Corner of the new patened Land runing then astrate Line to a possimon in the fork of the branch this to be the dividing Line for both to have 125 acers apes and 1 horse and 1 hefer 1 beade and furnture my tules is to be equaly devided betwend my 2 sons

my puter is to be equaly devided betwend John Mary and Solomon

I give and bequeath to my dafter mary 1 bead and furnetear 1 hefer and 1 colt if ever the mair has another colte—-

I give to my wife mary my hole astate dureng her widohod I do hearbey make and Apint Amos Cuthrell and John Tingle my Sole Executors in witness where unto I have set my hand and fixed my seal

Solomon [his mark, being a rather sloppy “S”] Tingle

William Wain
Israel Tingle

At the bottom of the second page, there is a codicil:

I also give to my wife 5 head of cattle feburary the 22 1794 I also give to my son Solomon my gun and my hanmill I also give to my dafter mary my wolen whel and my Lenen whele

After her deses the cattle I give to my son Solomon Tingle

Solomon [his mark] Tingle

Amos Cuthrell
John Blakey

Who was Ephraim Gatlin?

I have three Gatlin lines and all of them lead back to one couple:  John Gatlin and Esther Tingle.  John Gatlin and James Gatlin purchased a marriage bond January 6, 1784 for John to marry Esther Tingle.   There are two sources that lay out their children. The first is a deed of gift (Craven County Deed Book 30, page 130), dated February 22, 1793, from Esther’s father, Solomon, to the children:

To all People to whom these presents shall come I Solomon Tingle do send Greeting.

Know ye, that I the said Solomon Tingle of the State of North Carolina in the County of Craven Farmer for and in consideration of the love good will and affection which I have and do bear towards my loving grand children Abner Gatlin, Mille Gatlin Shadrack Gatlin Holon Gatlin of the same County sons and daughters of John Gatlin and Esther his Wife, have Given and Granted and by these presents do freely Give and Grant unto the said Abner Gatlin, Nille Gatlin Shadrach Gatlin Hollon Gatlin their Heirs Executors or administrators all to one Feather bed and furniture to one Linen Wheel, to one pewter bason, one pewter dish, four pewter plates, to five head of cattle to four head of hoggs, of which before the signing of these presents I have delivered them the said Children an Inventory signed with my own hand goods and cattles to the said Children their Heirs Executors or administrators from henceforth as their proper Goods and chattels absolutely without any manner of condition In Witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal this 22nd day of February 1793.

Signed Sealed & delivered                   Solomon (his mark) Tingle
In the presence of us
Amos Cutherell
John Tingle

March Craven County Court 1793
Then was the deed acknowledged in open court by Solomon Tingle the grantor and ordered to be recorded.

Attest Samuel Chapman CC

Many Tingle researchers seem to be unaware of Esther’s relationship to Solomon. Probably due to her omission from his will, dated September 30, 1784. In it, he mentions sons Solomon and John, daughter Mary, and wife Mary. The will was proven March Term 1795. I strongly suspect that he had another daughter not mentioned in the will, the Mills Tingle who married John King October 11, 1782 with Amos Cuthrell as bondsman.  According to the text of their respective bonds, both Mills and Esther were “of Christ Church Parish”.  This raises the question, in my mind, anyway, of whether Solomon’s wife, Mary, was a Mills. But that’s a puzzle for another time.

The second piece of documentation proving the children of John Gatlin and Esther Tingle comes from Craven County Deed Book 39, page 535:

This Indenture made and executed, this eleventh day of September, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and fifteen by and between Esther Gatlin, widow and Abner Gatlin, Shadrach Gatlin, Jeremiah Roe and Milly his wife, Shadrach Roe and Holland his wife, heirs at law of John Gatlin deceased of the County of Craven, and State of North Carolina of the one part, and John Reel Esquire of the County & State aforesaid, of the other part; Witnesseth, that the said Esther Gatlin, Abner Gatlin, Shadrach Gatlin, Jeremiah Roe and Milly his wife, and Shadrach Roe and Holland his wife, for and in consideration of the sum of Dollars to them in hand paid, by the said John Reel at and before the sealing and delivery of these presents, the receipt whereof they do hereby acknowledge, have given, granted, bargained, and sold, and by these presents do give, grant, bargain and sell, unto the said John Reel his heirs and assigns their undivided shares or portions of a certain tract or parcel of land situate, lying and being in the County of Craven on the north side of Neuse river and the West side of Morgan’s Swamp, beginning at a white oak in the fork of turkey neck branch and running thence, north forty five Degrees West one hundred and sixty poles crossing the main prong of turkey neck branch, to a stake in back [or buck] savannah, about half a pole to the north east of a marked pine saplin, then north forty five Degrees East one hundred and sixty poles to a pine, in or near John Gatlin’s other patent, then to the beginning, containing one hundred and ten acres, more or less, being the same tract which was patented by the said John Gatlin 24th day of October, A.D. 1782.–To Have and to hold that portion, share or dividend of the said tract herin before bounded & described with its appurtenances, which descended to the said grantors as heirs of the said John Gatlin to the said John Reel his heirs and assigns for ever and the said grantors for themselves and their heirs, Executors and administrators, to and with the said John Reel his heirs and assigns do hereby covenant and grant thir said undivided interest and share in the tract herein before described with its appurtenances against themselves, the said grantors, and their respective heirs and against the lawful claim or claims of all persons whatsoever, unto the said John Reel his heirs and assigns forever to warrant secure and defend by these presents– In Witness whereof the said Esther Gatlin, Abner Gatlin, Shadrach Gatlin, Jeremiah Roe and Milly his wife, & Shadrach Roe and Holland his wife, have hereunto set their hands and seals, the day and year first above written.–

Esther [her mark] Gatlin
Abner Gatlin
Shaderach Gatlin
Jeremiah Roe
Milly [her mark] Roe
Shadrick Roe
Hollon [her mark] Roe

Signed sealed and Delivered in the presence of
Jacob Burch
Wm Gatlin

So, the children of John Gatlin and Esther Tingle were:

  • Abner Gatlin (b. 1785)
  • Mills “Millie” Gatlin (b. 1788) married Jeremiah Roe January 29, 1812 with Abner Gatlin as bondsman
  • Shadrack Gatlin (b. 1790) married Margaret Stevenson May 15, 1811 with Elijah Gatlin as bondsman
  • Holland Gatlin (b. 1792) married Shadrack Roe December 17, 1811 with Jeremiah Roe as bondsman

I descend from all but Abner.  Shadrack through Mom’s maternal grandmother and both Mills and Holland through Dad’s maternal grandmother.

It all looked pretty cut and dried until I found another deed, Deed Book 41, page 306:

This Indenture made this 16th day of December one thousand eight hundred and sixteen between Esther Gatlin, Abner Gatlin, Shadrick Gatlin, Jeremiah Roe and Milly his wife grantors of the County of Craven and State of North Carolina of the one part for and in consideration of one hundred dollars to them in hand paid by Shaderick Roe of the County and State aforesaid of the other part at the sealing and signing of these presents the receipt and payment whereof is hereby is acknowledged the said Grantors have bargained sold conveyed and confirmed and do hereby bargain sell convey and confirm unto Shaderick Roe his heirs and assigns forever our several undivided shares in a certain piece or parcel of land lying and being in the County of Craven on the North side of Neuse river and east side of Little Swift creek and east side of Bumpy ground swamp begining at a small sweet gum on the said Swamp to the center of a big laurel and sweet gum and turns No. 62 Et. 25 poles to a pine John Harris’ corner then with his line No 45 Et 128 poles then So 18 Et 60 poles to a stake then So 6 Wt 80 poles to a pine then So 40 Wt 66 poles to a pine in Simon Bexley’s line then with his line No 42 Wt 60 poles to a stake then So 67 Wt 56 poles to the Bumpy ground Swamp then with the various courses of the said Swamp to the begining which land was patented by Ephraim Gatlin and by a legal decent came to the present proprietors and by them sold to Shaderick Roe. To have and to hold the said several undivided shares contained in said Ephraim Gatlin’s Patent with all ways woods waters and every other appurtenance thereunto belonging to Shaderick Roe his his heirs and assigns forever in fee simple and we the said grantors for ourselves our heirs Exrs. and admirs do covenant and promise to and with the said Shaderick Roe his heirs and assigns that we shall and will warrant and forever defend each of our undivided shares in the aforesaid patent free from all lawful claim or claims of any person or persons whatsoever. In witness whereof we have hereunto set our hands and seals the day and year first above written.

Ester [her mark] Gatlin
Abner [his mark] Gatlin
Shaderick Gatlin
Jeremiah Roe
Milly [her mark] Roe

Signed Sealed and delivered in presence of
John [his mark] Evernton
Lazarous [his mark] Ipock

Who was Ephraim Gatlin? The only other document I’ve found with his name on it is the patent mentioned in the aforementioned deed, entered January 10, 1798 and issued June 3, 1799. If he’s old enough to patent land in 1798, then he was born in or before 1778.  How does he fit into the overall Gatlin jigsaw and by what legal descent did Esther and her children come by this land?  Does anyone out there have a clue?  Cause I don’t.  I’ve considered two possibilities:

  1. That Ephraim was John’s son by a previous marriage.  But this would not explain how Esther would have acquired any share in the land.
  2. That Esther married Ephraim sometime after John’s death.  But, in the first deed, dated September 11, 1815, she’s referred to as Esther Gatlin, widow.  The second deed is dated December 16, 1816.  So when did John die?  Ephraim?  There is no estate record for Ephraim, but there are three for a John Gatlin dated 1801, 1807, and 1811.
    1. John Gatlin, Sr. (1801) – Died before March 9, 1801.  On that date, Esther Gatlen, John Gatlen and David Gatlen paid £100 administrator bond on the estate of John Gatlen.
    2. John Gatlin (1807) – Clearly, this is the John who married the widow Dolly Barnes.
    3. John Gatlin (1811) – Died before June 10, 1811 when Esther Gatlin, Abner Gatlin & Shadrack Gatlin paid £500 administrator bond on the estate of John Gatlin.

    Chances are high that our John is the one who died in 1811.  Looking at the estate sale, which occurred July 3, 1811, Esther, Milly, Abner, Hollan, and Shadrick are the top buyers.  John Gatlin, Sr. is, probably, the one who married Esther Johnson sometime in the 1760s.  The only other documents in our John’s estate folder pertain to the required audit and settlement of the accounts of the administrator, in this case, Esther, with the Estate.  This is dated March 5, 1816.  Usually, when a widow remarries, and that widow is the administratrix/executrix of an estate, those duties are transferred to the new husband.  There is no documentation to show that this occurred in this case.

It’s a puzzle.

Here’s a little something else to throw out there, from Deed Book 33, page 107:

State of North Carolina, Craven County

To all Men to whom these presents shall come I Elizabeth Gatlin senr. send greeting. Know ye that I the said Elizabeth Senr. of the County and State aforesaid for and in Consideration of the Love good Will and affection, which I have and do bear towards my two Grand Sons Abner Gatlin & Shadrick Gatlin, both of this County & State have given & granted and bye these presents do freely give and grant unto my said two Grand Sons Abner & Shadrick Gatlin their Heirs & Assigns forever, a Certain Tract or parcel of Land lying and being in the State and County aforesaid and on the South East Side of Swifts Creek and North Side of Neuse River: Beginning at a large Pine by the Side of the white March, from thence So. 29 ds. East 40 poles to a post in Samuel Lawsons given Line thence North 65 Et. with Lawsons given ine 153 pole to his Beginning Corner a Gum in Kitten Bridge Swamp then South 55 ds East with Lawsons line 83 pole to a pine, then No. 40 ds. East 52 pole to a Stake in Ephraim Pearcesis Line then North 30 ds with his line 45 pole to a Light wood Stump said Pearceis beginning Corner in or near Willis’s Line 154 pole to the cutting Ledge [or Lodge] Marsh then along the Marsh side and binding on the Side of the Marsh to the Beginning Containing one hundred and fifty Acres of Land, unto them the aforesaid Abner and Shadrick Gatlin and their Heirs and Assigns forever, with all the Houses plantations Timber profits, benefits and advantages to the same belonging or in any wise appertaining unto them the said Abner & Shadrick Gatlin their Heirs and Assigns forever may have hold and quietly possess the aforesaid Land and Improvements Clear from the just Claim of the aforesaid Elizabeth Gatlin her Heirs or any other person or persons whatsoever to their proper use, without any manner of Consideration. In Witness whereof I have hereunto put my Hand & Seal this ? day of ? 1797 August the 12th day

signed sealed & delivered in the presence of us

Elizabeth [her mark] Gatlin
Lazarus [his mark] Gatlin
Baron [his mark] Gatlin
Mary [her mark] Gatlin
Levi Burch

State of North Carolina
Craven County Court March Term 1798
Then was the foregoing Deed proved in open Court agreable to Law and ordered to be registered
Attest Saml Chapman CC

The identity of this Elizabeth Gatlin, Senr. is just one more Gatlin puzzle. Trust me, there were a lot of Gatlins marrying women named Elizabeth!  This land was originally entered by John Gatlen, Junr. May 8, 1779 and his grant issued October 9, 1783.  He sold it to Elizabeth August 6, 1792 for £100 (Deed Book 30, page 139).

Oh, and, if you’re curious, here is John Gatlin’s “other patent” mentioned in the John Reel deed (North Carolina Land Grant Images and Data, Book 20, pg. 707, Grant No.: 110):

John Gatlin: 100 acres Craven on the N side of Neuse river and on the W side of Morgans Swamp Beginning at the head of Turkey neck at a post oak and runs No 75 W 127 poles to a pine then So 15 W 127 poles to a pine then So 75 E 127 poles to a pine on Morgans Swamp from thence a direct course to the Beginning dated 14th November 1771.                                                                                                     Jo Martin


Will of John Swindell

the Name of God amen the 3rd Day of April 1775 I John Swindell of the County of Hyde and in the Province of North Carolina Being vary Sick in Body But of perfect memory thanks be to God therefore Calling to mind the Mortality of the Body I therefore make and ordain this my Last Will and Testament first of all I give my Soul into the hands of Almighty God and as for my Worldly Estate I give in manner following that is I give to my Executors so much of my goods and chattles as will pay all my Debts as I doe of Right Due to any Person.

Item: I give to my son Isaac one hundred acres of Land Lying on the south side of the Lake with one horse or mare and one gun and one bed and furniture

Item: I give to my son Josiah one hundred acres of land as by Deed Directed

Item: I give to my son Jesse one hundred acres of Land as by Deed Directed

Item: I give to my son Joseph one hundred acres of Land as by Deed Directed with one cow & calf

Item: I give to my wife Rebacker the house and plantation where I now live with fifty acres of Land to be hers [I think] During her natural Life and at her Deceas to fall to my son Joel to him and his arrs [heirs] for ever with one Cow and Calf and one horse or mare.

Item: I give to my Son Jobe one Cow and Calf and one horse or mair and one gun–

Item: I give to my son John one Cow and Calf and one horse or mair and one gun

Item: I give to my Daughter Ruth one Cow and Calf and one Bed and furniture

Item: I give to my Daughter Prudence one cow and Calf and one Bed and furniture

Item: I give to Daughter Rachal one cow an dCalf and one Bed and Furniture

Item: I give my son Jonathan one cow and Calf & my Will is that all the Rest of my Worly Estate within and without Shall be Equielly Devided between my Wife and my three youngest Sons and further that my Sons Isaac and my Son Josiah Shall be my Executors and I acknowledge this to be my Last Will and Testament wherefore I have Set my hand and Seal in the Presents of us

Joab Daniels
Shadrach Morris                                                              John Swindell

Hyde County – June Term 1775
This Will was proved in Court by the oath of Joab Daniels, ordered to be Recorded
Test Geo. Barrow Clk

Transcribed Dec 4 1899
from Record of Wills and Accounts
No 1 Page 163
R. D. Harris Clk