Alias Grace

I haven’t read this particular Atwood title, but, after watching this, I will!

Advertisements

Ancient DNA reveals origins of the Minoans and Mycenaeans | EurekAlert! Science News

The question of the origins of the Minoans and their relationship to the Mycenaeans, Europe’s first literate societies, has long puzzled researchers. A paper published today in Nature suggests that, rather than being advanced outsiders, the Minoans had deep roots in the Aegean and were closely related to the Mycenaeans, and to modern Greeks.

Source: Ancient DNA reveals origins of the Minoans and Mycenaeans | EurekAlert! Science News

and

DNA analysis of archaeological remains has revealed that Ancient Minoans and Mycenaens were genetically similar with both peoples descending from early Neolithic farmers. They likely migrated from Anatolia to Greece and Crete thousands of years before the Bronze Age. Modern Greeks are largely descendants of the Mycenaeans, the study found.The Minoan civilization flourished on Crete beginning in the third millennium B.C.E. and was advanced artistically and technologically. The Minoans were also the first literate people of Europe.

Source: Ancient DNA analysis reveals Minoan and Mycenaean origins | EurekAlert! Science News

Bronze Age Iberia received fewer steppe invaders than the rest of Europe | EurekAlert! Science News

The genomes of individuals who lived on the Iberian Peninsula in the Bronze Age had minor genetic input from Steppe invaders, suggesting that these migrations played a smaller role in the genetic makeup and culture of Iberian people, compared to other parts of Europe. Daniel Bradley and Rui Martiniano of Trinity College Dublin, in Ireland, and Ana Maria Silva of University of Coimbra, Portugal, report these findings July 27, 2017, in PLOS Genetics.

Source: Bronze Age Iberia received fewer steppe invaders than the rest of Europe | EurekAlert! Science News

DNA evidence is rewriting domestication origin stories | Science News

DNA studies are rewriting the how-we-met stories of domestication.

Source: DNA evidence is rewriting domestication origin stories | Science News

Ancestry Queries

I’ve made a few more queries on the Message Boards at Ancestry.  No replies, yet, but fingers crossed.

Topic: Hiram Wright
Board: Chatham County, North Carolina

I am looking for the parents of Hiram Wright. He was born 12 Dec 1813 in either Chatham or Cumberland County and died 27 May 1907 in Robeson County. He married three times, all in Cumberland County: Sarah Bowden in 1842, Elizabeth Bowden in 1850, and Nancy Ann Bowden in 1863. I know that there was an adult Hiram Wright in Chatham County in 1814, because he was the bondsman for James McMath and Polly Johnson. Also, on 12 Nov 1807, Hiram Wright apprenticed himself to Aaron Evans for 3 years and 2 months, as a wheelwright. I would be grateful for any other information about either Hiram.


Topic: James Cross (b. about 1755, died 1832) and Paul Curtis (say 1810-1844)
Board: Beaufort County, North Carolina

I am looking for information on James Cross who wrote his will 13 Oct 1832. Wife Sally, son William, daughters Nancy, Peggy, and Patsy. Witnesses were William Pritchard and Paul Curtis. Will proven on the oath of Paul Curtis in Nov 1832. A James Cross can be found listed in census records in Beaufort County from 1800 to 1830. It is possible that he was the James Cross listed in Martin County in 1790. From the census, I calculate that he was born in about 1755 and Sally in about 1785. More than likely, she was a second wife.

My theory is that I descend from their daughter, Nancy. I think she married Paul Curtis about 1833. I cannot find them in the 1840 census. But, in 1850, in the household of Simon Edwards, is his wife, Nancy (b. 1817), their three children William, Marshall, and Winifred (my ancestor) as well as a Sarah Curtis aged 16 and an Elzar Curtis aged 6. And in 1860 there’s a Jane Curtis, aged 19. There was a marriage, 4 Sep 1869, between Sally Edwards, daughter of Paul and Nancy Curtis, to William H. H. Norman, son of Smith and Salina Norman.

I understand that Simon Edwards left a will, about 1876, and it can only be accessed through the Clerk of Court in Washington, NC. It’s on my to do list if I ever get up there.

I would appreciate any information about James Cross and/or Paul Curtis.

Thank you,
Becky


Topic: Jonathan Beasley
Boards: Wake County, North Carolina; Johnston County, North Carolina; and Surname: Beasley

I’ve read at Beasley Family Pedigrees at WorldFamilies.net, and a few other places, that my Isaac Beasley (the one who married Pheraby Roberts) was the son of Jonathan Beasley of Wake County. Does anyone have any documentation to prove this?

I’ve found a few pieces of evidence that hint at Jonathan having been the son of James Beasley, Sr. who was the son of John Beasley who wrote his will in 1787, but nothing linking Isaac to Jonathan.


Topic: Charles Bargeau, aka Henry Williamson
Boards: Middlesex, England and Surname: Bargo also posted versions of this on the London and Middlesex Board at RootsChat and the Family Research Board at Family Tree Forum

I recently found one of my ancestors, Henry Williamson, in a document collection known as The John Gray Blount Papers. Mr. Blount was a merchant based in the town of Washington in Beaufort County, North Carolina during the late 18th and early 19th centuries. According to these documents, Mr. Williamson, a very old, very poor man, and blind or nearly so, was also a merchant and a farmer living on Lake Mattamuskeet, but that he had lived in London at one time. It also comes to light that Henry Williamson is an assumed name and that he was born Charles Bargeau!

There are several letters in the collection (Volume 3) between him and his “niece” Mary Fitzgerald of Charles Street, St. James’s Square, London. The topic of these letters, and others, is a Legacy of South Seas Annuities descending to Mr. Bargeau/Williamson via the marriage agreement of one of his siblings. The marriage in question produced one known child, Ms. Fitzgerald. The other heirs are her uncles, Charles/Henry being one of them, though brothers of which parent is never clarified. The others are: John who died in Lisbon at the house of Mayne & Co. c. 1771, Joseph who went to the East Indies in about 1752 and hadn’t been heard of since, and Francis who died a Midshipman aboard the Griffen Man of War (Thomas Taylor, Captain) at Antigua c. 1772. And, in fact, I’ve found a notice taken out in the Lisbon Gazette in August 1796 concerning this Legacy and saying, I think, that John, Joseph, and/or Francis, or their heirs, have until November 28 to appear in Chancery Court in London to obtain their share(s). There is a book published decades after Henry’s death, A list of the Names of such Proprietors of Annuities, transferable at the South-Sea House, as were entitled to Dividends on or before the 5th of July, 1837, and which remained unpaid on the 10th of October, 1842, that says there 3 dividends to which he was entitled and that they became available in July 1796.

The only other reference I’ve found to a Charles Bargeau comes from Volume 14 of the Proceedings of the Huguenot Society of London which mentions someone of that name, son of John Bargeau “late of Spitalfields” being bound as a goldsmith in 1749. Also, I’ve found a Francis Bargeau of Middlesex, son of John Bargeau of Spitalfields, Middlesex, deceased, apprenticed 17 Apr 1755 to Robert Bayley as a draper. And a christening record of a Francis Bargeau, son of John and Margaret, at Christ Church 21 Sep 1740. A John Bargeau was buried in Spitalfield 20 May 1745, and a Margaret 26 Jun 1743.

Henry and his wife, Ann, had 4 daughters and 2 sons. Interestingly, one of the sons was named Peter LeCuse Williamson. I know there were several Peter Le Keux, silk weavers, who were prominent in Spitalfields from the late 17th century on into the early 19th. There was a marriage in St. Michael, Cornhill, London 10 Apr 1735 between John Le Keux of Norton Folgate and Mary Bargeau of Christ Church. And, at St. George, there was a marriage between Mary Le Keux and Keane Fitzgerald 29 Oct 1788. Question is, am I the right track? I read somewhere, can’t remember where, that the Mary Le Keux who married Keane was the daughter of a Mary Le Keux and a Peter Le Keux.

Any help would be much appreciated. Thanks!

Becky

Thousands of horsemen may have swept into Bronze Age Europe, transforming the local population | Science | AAAS

Europeans may be descendants of a massive migration of men from the Russian steppe

Source: Thousands of horsemen may have swept into Bronze Age Europe, transforming the local population | Science | AAAS

DNA of early Neanderthal gives timeline for new modern human-related dispersal from Africa | EurekAlert! Science News

Annette Günzel, © Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History

This is a schematic representation of the evolutionary scenario for mitochondrial and nuclear DNA in archaic and modern humans. Neanderthal mitochondrial DNA recovered in this study suggests an intermediate migration out of Africa before 220,000 years ago.

 

Ancient mitochondrial DNA from the femur of an archaic European hominin is helping resolve the complicated relationship between modern humans and Neanderthals. The genetic data, recovered by a team from the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, the University of Tuebingen, and others, provides a timeline for a proposed migration out of Africa that occurred after the ancestors of Neanderthals arrived in Europe by a lineage more closely related to modern humans.

Source: DNA of early Neanderthal gives timeline for new modern human-related dispersal from Africa | EurekAlert! Science News

The Brothers Bourden: Isle of Wight County, Virginia

Nicholas Bourden and Prudence Wrenn, “relict” of John Wrenn, were married in Isle of Wight County, Virginia, before 1738 (The Marriages of Isle of Wight County, Virginia, 1628-1800 by Blanche Adams Chapman, page 5).  On November 16th of that year, Nicholas was referred to as “brother-in-law” in the will of Prudence’s brother, Samuel Davis (Wills and Administrations of Isle of Wight County, Virginia, 1647-1800, Volume 2, by Blanche Adams Chapman, page 136).  Since their first child was born in April of 1737, they were most likely married in 1736.  There is a John Wrenn whose estate was ordered to be appraised March 22, 1735.  Whether this was Prudence’s husband or some other John Wrenn, I don’t know.  She married him sometime before August 15, 1734, when she’s referred to as Prudence Wrenn in the will of her brother, Thomas Davis (Wills and Administrations of Isle of Wight County, Virginia, 1647-1800, Volume 2, page 70), but after 1720 when she’s referred to as Prudence Davis in the will of her mother, Mary Davis (Wills and Administrations of Isle of Wight County, Virginia, 1647-1800, Volume 2, page 9).  There is reason to believe the marriage took place before 1727 (see below).  Also, the wording of her mother’s will may imply that Prudence had not yet attained the age of 21.

The births of Nicholas and Prudence’s five children were recorded in the Newport Parish Vestry Book, which can be viewed at FamilySearch.org (Virginia, Isle of Wight County Records, 1634-1951 – Church Records – Vestry Book, 1727-1772).  Bottom right of image 117 for the boys, left side of image 119 for Mary.  If you’d rather not strain your eyes reading old documents, this information can also be found in Tyler’s Quarterly Historical and Genealogical Magazine, Volume 9, Number 2, page 119. This can also be accessed through FamilySearch.

The children of Nicholas Bourden and Prudence Davis Wrenn were:

  • Samuel Bourden b. April 14, 1737
  • John Bourden b. June 10, 1739
  • Nicholas Bourden, Jr. b. March 25, 1741
  • Baker Bourden b. January 10, 1742/3
  • Mary Bourden b. March 30, 1745

The above list is slightly different from that found in Tyler’s Quarterly which has Baker being born in the month of June.  However, looking at the Vestry Book, I think it may actually be January.  Compare the June written for John

JohnBourdenVestryDate

with what’s written for Baker.

BakerBourdenVestryDate

Doesn’t the second letter look like an “a” rather than a “u”?  And the fourth more a “u” than an “e”?  Its being January instead of June would also explain the 1742/3 thing.  Mary’s birth year is written in Roman numerals, of all things:  MDCCXLV.  The “V” is written with quite a flourish.

Besides the five children she gave Nicholas, Prudence had two children with John Wrenn.  One of these was named John.  In the Vestry Book, at the very bottom of image 117, you can just make out “John Wren son of John Wren and Prudence his wife….”  The next line, which would be his birth date, is illegible due to extreme fading.

JohnWrenVestry

We know there was another child because of the Accounts of the Estate of John Wrenn (scroll down a bit), taken by Nicholas and Prudence in 1748 (James Baker was ordered to audit the Accounts of the Estate August 12, 1748), in which there is the entry “To bringing up two small Children.”  The implication being that the youngest was now of age. In those days, this meant they were at least 21 years of age, that is born in or before 1727.  I’ve seen several online trees that say the Thomas Wrenn who married Catherine Ingram was the other child, but, as yet, no one has offered any actual proof that I’ve seen.

If Nicholas and Prudence used conventional Colonial naming patterns, which is suggested by second son John, for her father, John Davis, and third son, Nicholas (for him), then eldest son, Samuel, would have been named after his paternal grandfather.  As for the fourth son, Baker, I’ve wondered if Baker was the maiden name of Nicholas’s mother.  Thus, Nicholas Bourden, Sr., may have been the son of Samuel Bourden and ? Baker.  Of course, I have no proof of that, so it’s complete speculation.

With Prudence, we’re on much firmer ground.  She was the daughter of John Davis and Mary Green.  An abstract of John’s will can be found in Chapman’s Wills and Administrations of Isle of Wight County, Virginia, 1647-1800, Volume 1, page 79, and Mary’s in Volume 2, page 9.  We’ll get into her family in more detail in future posts.

The first appearance of Nicholas Bourden in the records was in Elizabeth City County where on December 2, 1734, he witnessed the will of John Kerby (Wills and Administrations of Elizabeth City County, Virginia, 1688-1800 by Blanche Adams Chapman, page 48).  And on April 4, 1735, still in Elizabeth City County, he witnessed another will, that of Mary Picket (same source, page 69).  After his marriage to Prudence, Nicholas’s name is peppered throughout the second volume of Chapman’s Wills and Administrations of Isle of Wight County as he appraises, examines and settles many estates.  The first of these occurs at the bottom of page 91, where he and Lawrence Baker settle the estate of Jeremiah Ingraham, October 23, 1738.

On December 20, 1738, Nicholas Bourden wrote a letter to The Virginia Gazette about a tragic incident which occurred the Wednesday prior, December 13 (Some Descendants of John Moone ca 1600-1655 and Nicholas Bourden ca 1700-1759: Jamestown and Isle of wight County In the Colony of Virginia by Richard Bowden Jones, page 7, citing The Virginia Gazette, Issue Number 133).  Images of the Virginia Gazette can be accessed through the Colonial Williamsburg website.  Go to Research – Online Resources – Digital Library – Virginia Gazettes.  You’re looking for Parks, 1739, February 23.  This letter is on page 3, bottom right.

Isle of Wight County, Dec. 20, 1738

Mr. Parks,
The Publication of the following unhappy Accident, may be a Means to prevent the like in other Families, which I hope will be a Warning to all; and desire it may be inserted in your Gazette, for the Public Good. On Wednesday the Thirteenth of this Instant, I intended to kill some hogs, and accordingly put a Kettle of water, containing 20 Gallons, over the Fire, for that Purpose; and when the Water was boiling, none being in the Kitchen but my only Child and a Negro child, the Sway-Pole broke, and scalded them to such a Degree that twas a most horrid Spectacle, and must have moved the most obdurate. The Negro Child is dead, but my own Child, I hope is in a fair Way of Recover tho’ prodigiously scalded: My Wife very narrowly escaped the same Fate; for she had not gone three Steps from the Kitchen Door, before the Kettle fell down, when she sat on her Hams, putting some Potatoes in the Fire for the Children: The Children were both in the Corner when the Kettle fell down, or it must have been present Death.

I am, Sir, Your humble Servant,

Nicholas BOURDEN.

Samuel would have been just over a year and half and Prudence would have been carrying John, though she may not have known it yet.

Adventurers of Purse and Person, Virginia, 1607-1624/5: Families G-P by John Frederick Dorman, page 681, mentions that Samuel was ordered bound to John Dering, a tailor, August 1, 1751.  He’d have been 14.  Samuel, along with James Dering and Martha Dering, witnessed the will of Benjamin Barlow (bottom of page and onto next page) December 26, 1757.  The will was registered April 5, 1759.

Louise Jones abstracted entries from various Isle of Wight County records concerning “Orphans and Other Children of Isle of Wight County” which were published over several issues of The Virginia Genealogical Society Quarterly and of which I’ve only had glimpses thanks to my free Ancestry account.  I can’t afford a paid account right now, so all I get are frustrating snippets.  But what intriguing snippets they are!

  • August 1,…Samuel Bourden, orphan of Nicholas is…Taylor [James Dering, tailor?]. p. 342.   (Volume 25, Number 2)
  • 6 July…John Bourden, orphan of Nicholas, is to…    (Volume 26, Number 1)
  • Snippet of the index to Volume 26, Number 1 lists Baker on page 32 and John on page 31

If you put the snippet about Samuel together with the apprentice bond mentioned in Dorman, both dated August 1, then it’s possible that Nicholas Bourden had died earlier in 1751 or in late 1750.  On page 8 of his book cited above, Richard Bowden Jones says that John was bound out in July 1759 and Baker in November of that year.  I’ve yet to find mention of young Nicholas being apprenticed to anyone.  If anyone has further information on this, either through the aforementioned article or the Isle of Wight County Order Book, 1746-1752, please contact me via comments.  Thank you so much, in advance.

Young Nicholas witnessed the will of a John Davis February 1, 1762 (Wills and Administrations of Isle of Wight County, Virginia, 1647-1800, Volume 3, by Blanche Adams Chapman, page 12).  Whether uncle or cousin, I’m not sure.  John Bourden was one of the men to appraise the estate of John Jackson which was recorded January 6, 1763 (same source, page 20).  This is the last public record, that I’m aware of, in which John appears.  It’s possible he died shortly after this.  And, as far as I know, there’s no mention of Mary after her birth.  Of course, it’s harder to find women in the records and she may have married or she may have died in childhood.  Either way, she’s left no trace. There is no record, that I know of, that either John or Mary ever left Virginia, but the other three migrated to Duplin County, North Carolina.

Which is where we’ll follow them next.


Update 7/7/2017:  I finally managed access to the above mentioned articles in the Virginia Genealogical Society Quarterly.  The article, “Orphans and Other Children of Isle of Wight County”, yielded no further information than that given by Mr. Jones in his book and recounted above.  However, there was another article, “Isle of Wight County Order Book, 1746-1752” (Volumes 38 through 40), which gave me this gem, from Volume 40-1, p. 54 (emphasis mine):

Francis Wrenn, plantiff, vs. Nicholas Bourden, type: in chancery, verdict: dismissed due to the death of the defendant.

The date for that entry was January 4, 1749.  From this, we can conclude that Nicholas died late in 1748.  Other entries from the Order Books:

9 Apr 1747 – William Sutter provided evidence for Robert Bureswetter, Gent. vs. Nicholas Bourden.
9 Jul 1747 – Robert Burwell, Gent. plantiff, vs. Nicholas Bourden.
5 Apr 1750 – John Davis, Edward Brantley & wife Mary, Nicholas Bourden & wife Prudence, & Sarah Murry, plantiffs vs. John Davis admin of Elizabeth Davis…verdict dismissed, parties agreed.

“…Out on your corner in the pouring rain…”

I heard this at Walmart the other day and it’s been stuck in my head ever since. Maybe because it was pouring rain when I went in. 🙂

I don’t mind spending every day / Out on your corner in the pouring rain….

June Reads, 2017

SilverSilence_SinghSilver Silence by Nalini Singh.  I loved this book! Hope we get to see a whole lot more of StoneWater. And add my vote for an Arwen/Pasha novella. Pretty please!  Lots of other story possibilities here.  Stasya and someone from BlackEdge, for instance.  Tanique and Leila.  I don’t think it’s time for Bo, because I really think he’s going to be paired with Miane.  And, of course, poor Lily.

About the Architect.  Shoshona would be way too easy.  But I have no doubt she’s involved, and no doubt thinks she’s the Architect!

Lady Susan by Jane Austen.  I very much enjoyed this early Austen work and don’t see why anyone thinks it needed a rewrite.  It didn’t take very long at all for me to have a serious hate on for Lady Susan Vernon.

DangerousDuke-London_HunterThe Most Dangerous Duke in London by Madeline Hunter.  Typical historical romance with an angry hero bent on revenge on the heroine’s family.  Enjoyable while I was reading, but not much stuck with me afterwards.  The heroine, Lady Clara, was a little unusual in that she was aware of this possible/probable motive for seduction.

Mansfield Park by Jane Austen.  After reading and loving Lady Susan, I decided to read another Jane Austen work I hadn’t yet read.  I didn’t like it nearly as much.  Mostly, I think, because I didn’t warm to any of the characters.  No one stood out or inspired much emotion in me at all.  Very un-Austen.  The exception on the emotion front was Mr. Crawford.  I wanted to smack him.

Neanderthal_CameronThe Last Neanderthal by Claire Cameron.  This was an enjoyable, imaginative read, but I think I would have enjoyed this book more without the trips into the modern world.  I realize that the comparison between Girl and Rose, between a Neanderthal and a modern human female, was one of the main themes of the books, but I would have preferred knowing how Girl interacted with the female who was and was not part of the families she meets at the end of the novel.

The Chosen by J. R. Ward.  The only thing of interest here, for me, was Lassiter’s change in station.  Layla and X’cor hold no interest for me, and, frankly, I’m getting a little tired of Qhuinn being an ass and Blay tragically suffering for it.  I think this marks the end of the BDB for me.  I’m even less interested in Assail than I was in Layla and X’cor.