Ancient DNA reveals origins of the Minoans and Mycenaeans | EurekAlert! Science News

The question of the origins of the Minoans and their relationship to the Mycenaeans, Europe’s first literate societies, has long puzzled researchers. A paper published today in Nature suggests that, rather than being advanced outsiders, the Minoans had deep roots in the Aegean and were closely related to the Mycenaeans, and to modern Greeks.

Source: Ancient DNA reveals origins of the Minoans and Mycenaeans | EurekAlert! Science News

and

DNA analysis of archaeological remains has revealed that Ancient Minoans and Mycenaens were genetically similar with both peoples descending from early Neolithic farmers. They likely migrated from Anatolia to Greece and Crete thousands of years before the Bronze Age. Modern Greeks are largely descendants of the Mycenaeans, the study found.The Minoan civilization flourished on Crete beginning in the third millennium B.C.E. and was advanced artistically and technologically. The Minoans were also the first literate people of Europe.

Source: Ancient DNA analysis reveals Minoan and Mycenaean origins | EurekAlert! Science News

Bronze Age Iberia received fewer steppe invaders than the rest of Europe | EurekAlert! Science News

The genomes of individuals who lived on the Iberian Peninsula in the Bronze Age had minor genetic input from Steppe invaders, suggesting that these migrations played a smaller role in the genetic makeup and culture of Iberian people, compared to other parts of Europe. Daniel Bradley and Rui Martiniano of Trinity College Dublin, in Ireland, and Ana Maria Silva of University of Coimbra, Portugal, report these findings July 27, 2017, in PLOS Genetics.

Source: Bronze Age Iberia received fewer steppe invaders than the rest of Europe | EurekAlert! Science News

DNA evidence is rewriting domestication origin stories | Science News

DNA studies are rewriting the how-we-met stories of domestication.

Source: DNA evidence is rewriting domestication origin stories | Science News

Thousands of horsemen may have swept into Bronze Age Europe, transforming the local population | Science | AAAS

Europeans may be descendants of a massive migration of men from the Russian steppe

Source: Thousands of horsemen may have swept into Bronze Age Europe, transforming the local population | Science | AAAS

“…Out on your corner in the pouring rain…”

I heard this at Walmart the other day and it’s been stuck in my head ever since. Maybe because it was pouring rain when I went in. 🙂

I don’t mind spending every day / Out on your corner in the pouring rain….

The Language of Homer

The Iliad and The Odyssey are two of the most enduring works of fiction (or “fiction”, if you prefer) ever composed.  Although it is doubtful that they were composed in their entirety by a single individual, they are traditionally attributed to a blind bard called Homer.  Recently, The World According to Sound aired a podcast about the language in which these works were composed.  A form of ancient Greek that sounded nothing like its modern descendant.  According to this, this dialect was a tonal language.  An example of a modern tonal language is Chinese.

The story was picked up and, partially, rebroadcast, on NPR’s All Things ConsideredThe Sound Of Ancient Greek.

 

 

From Nalini Singh’s Weblog: Silver Silence

Yay!  I was hoping Silver would get the next book.  If the Architect of the Consortium manages to take out her grandmother, then Silver will be the new matriarch of the Mercants.  Whether or not the plot succeeds, he/she will incur the clan’s enmity.  And Silver’s.  As for her man, the first person to pop in my head was Malachi.

Other candidates:  Remi would be fun.  A lot of people are suggesting Bo, which would be interesting, but I really think he will end  up with Miane.    And I think Tanique will be with be with the girl they rescued in Allegiance of Honor.  Can’t remember her name off the top of my head.

Source: Nalini Singh’s Weblog: Silver Silence

Proof: Tabitha, wife of Nicholas Bourden

Just hours after scheduling the previous post, The Brothers Bourden: Men of Family, I’ve discovered proof that Tabitha was, indeed, the wife of Nicholas Bourden, Revolutionary War Captain.

I was reading deeds at duplinrod.com, focusing on James and trying to untangle him from his nephew, when I found a bill of sale (Deed Book DFTU, page 433) wherein Nicholas Bourden sells to James Bourden a “certain Negro woman named Sue, aged twenty one years, for the sum of three hundred dollars.”  I’m unsure if these are James and his father or his two nephews, or some other combination thereof.  The witnesses were Nathan Garner and William Bourden.  At the bottom, after the witnesses’ signatures, it says:

a mistake in the [can’t make out this next word, but it begins with an “f”] of the Bill of Sale of Excepting Nicholas Bourden Senr. & Tabitha his Wife‘s lifetime.  a mistake by me James Bourden.

Here’s a screenshot so you can read it yourself.

ProofTabithawifeofNickSr

LibraryReads September List

library_reads_logo_websiteForman_LeaveMeLibraryReads has released their September list, and the favorite, Leave Me by Gayle Forman, looks pretty good. It’s main character, Maribeth Klein, is a magazine editor, wife, and mother of preschool-aged twins. Her life is so busy, so demanding, that when she has a heart attack and doesn’t realize it. Told to rest, she tries but this seems to be an imposition on the lives on others, she packs up and leaves. Of course, with distance, her life looks very different.

Colgan_BookshopPatchett_CommonwealthThe Bookshop on the Corner by Jenny Colgan and Ann Patchett’s Commonwealth also perked my interest. In the first a city librarian loses her job, moves to Middle-of-Nowhere, Scotland, and buys a van which she turns into a bookmobile, and the second features two families closely intertwined by adultery, betrayal, and abandonment.  A married father of four and a married mother of two leave their families to be with each other.  Commonweath explores the aftermath.

Bolton_Daisy I find I’m wavering back and forth about Sharon Bolton’s Daisy in Chains about a man convicted for being a serial killer, and, continuing to protest his innocence, hires a hotshot lawyer famous for getting convictions overturned. When I check, it actually sounds more intriguing on Goodreads than at LibraryReads.

Also on the list is the second book in Genevieve Cogman’s Invisible Library series, The Masked City. I haven’t gotten around to reading the first one, yet, but they sound interesting.

What about you? Anything on this list going on your TBR pile?

I Dreamed a Dream

A little much needed inspiration to start the day.  This performance never fails to bring a tear to my eye and a smile to my face.